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Pet Guardian Comments
The catsí guardian remarked that her animals had been treated with allopathy, homeopathy, Chinese herbs, reiki, Feldenkreis, chiropractic and jin shin. In the face of all these multiple therapies, Ayurveda was the vital missing link in providing an enhanced quality of life for the cats and their guardian. In particular, Ayurvedic herbs ended a ten-year battle with giardiasis and provided a welcome relief from cystitis. The cats were able to drop their homeopathics and cranberry extract at a significant financial savings. The successful discontinuation of Butterscotchís Tapezol was also an important financial savings.

Discussion:
The cats’ guardian remarked that her animals had been treated with allopathy, homeopathy, Chinese herbs, reiki, Feldenkreis, chiropractic and jin shin. In the face of all these multiple therapies, Ayurveda was the vital missing link in providing an enhanced quality of life for the cats and their guardian. In particular, Ayurvedic herbs ended a ten-year battle with giardiasis and provided a welcome relief from cystitis. The guardian was able to drop the cats’ homeopathics and cranberry extracts at a significant financial savings.

Benefits of Veterinary Ayurveda
Veterinary Ayurveda provides a benefit for the animal, the pet guardian and for Ayurveda. For the animal, Ayurveda provides greater longevity and well being, a preventative approach and a deep respect for the innate self-healing power of animals. For the pet-guardian, Ayurveda provides a healthier, happier companion animal and a safer home environment, free from the hazards of cross-species communicable diseases such as giardiasis. Ayurvedic approaches are also less expensive than either allopathy or supplements, a benefit for the pet guardian’s finances.

For Ayurveda, the small-animal veterinary angle offers a significant research benefit, since cats and dogs are shorter lived than humans and so provide opportunity to observe the lifelong benefits of Ayurveda within a shorter time frame. Cats and dogs respond swiftly to herbs and diet adjustments, well-portraying the value of Ayurveda. Developing veterinary Ayurveda also affords an additional avenue for the mainstreaming of Ayurveda within the healthcare delivery system.

The Future of Veterinary Ayurveda

Since animal healthcare is the scope of practice of veterinarians, the future of this dimension of Ayurvedic healing depends upon encouraging vets to study and practice Ayurveda, just as they have enthusiastically embraced homeopathy, naturopathy and Chinese medicine. Vets should receive a full practitioner training with emphasis on pulse diagnosis, in-depth understanding of samprapti and a thorough knowledge of herbal formulation. Only if Ayurvedic vets are thoroughly trained will the full benefits and potential of veterinary Ayurveda become apparent.

Alakananda Devi, M.B., B.S., is a British trained physician who travelled to India in 1980 where she met her teacher, Dr. Vasant Lad. She was among the first Western physicians to take up Ayurveda. She is principal of Alandi School of Ayurveda, a traditional gurukula, in Colorado and is known for her insightful articles on Ayurveda. Contact information:
Tel: 303-786-7037 Email: alandi_ashram@yahoo.com

The author would like to thank pet guardian Kathleen Geary and the friendly staff of Colorado Canines and Felines. Reprinted: Light on Ayurveda Journal, Vol. II, Issue 4, p. 18-19

Caring for Your Cat's Agni

As a carnivorous hunter, your cat's digestive system is very different from yours. Although the following rules may sound harsh from a human's perspective, they are essential for your cat's health.
1. Leave 12-24 hours between feedings
2. Do not expose your cat to the smell of cat food between feeding times.
3. All food MUST be room temperature to lukewarm, NEVER refrigerator-cold.
4. Feed your cat when he/she is most hungry. For many pitta cats, your bedtime is their dinner time.
5.Keep kitty's food bowl and utensils very clean.
6. Don't feed old or stale food.
7. Don't give kitty milk! Cats easily develop a severe addictive allergy to cow's milk.
8. Rotate protein sources. Cats readily develop food allergies and do not tolerate a mono-diet.
9. Avoid dry cat foods.
10. Your cat needs a calm, safe place to eat, where they have no fear of being chased or stepped on

 



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